Nederlandse Onderzoekschool voor Theologie en Religiewetenschap
Netherlands School for Advanced Studies in Theology and Religion

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ReMA Programmes in NL

As a research master student you might want to follow courses at other places than only your home university. The following courses are offered by the research master programmes of other Dutch universities in the academic year 2017-2018. Registering for these subsidiary courses is not possible via NOSTER. Please contact the faculty that offers the course for more information and registration procedures.

N.B. this page only shows the courses on the research master level. In the course catalogues (under ‘Programme’) you can all electives that are on masters level.

University of Groningen

Research Master Religion Studies and Theology

a) General information
b) Programme

  • Theories of Religion (10 EC | semester 1: September 2017 – January 2018)
    Today, most scholars conceptualize ‘religion’ primarily as a cultural phenomenon, using insights, methods and theories that are also applied in cultural studies. This course unit explores some of the key issues and texts of the academic study of religion. Students will encounter pioneering ideas that have influenced the development of the study of religion, become acquainted with the key figures who shaped these ideas, analyze influential texts and discuss issues posed by the introduction of new concepts and methods.

University of Amsterdam

Research Master Religious Studies
a) General information
b) Programme

  • Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion (15 EC | semester 1: September – January 2018)
    This course has a double task. The primary one is close reading and discussion of seminal contributions to the academic study of religions, in order to achieve a better understanding of the specific problems and debates of this discipline. The secondary task is to offer a platform for students to practice and train their skills of presentation, performance, and discussion. The reading material will have a special focus on contemporary critical theory and new approaches to the study of religion. These approaches will be discussed in relation to the students’ ongoing research. The coordinator is responsible for the whole course, but classes are taught in collaboration with various specialists from the department of Religious Studies.
  • Nature and the Supernatural (6 EC | semester 1: September – December 2017)Notions of Nature and the Supernatural have been fundamental to human culture since antiquity. The first half of this course introduces students to cosmogenesis, ideas of nature, myths of creation and accounts of the origin of the world from a variety of religious cultures: ancient Greek, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The second half of the course will focus on a diversity of ideas concerning Intermediary Beings and the Supernatural, again drawing from a variety of cultures, ranging from ancient and medieval beliefs concerning angels and spirits, devils and demons, ghosts, and the undead, to current spiritist practices in religions like Voodoo, Umbanda and Candomble. Students will be expected to participate actively in class, present and discuss articles from the reading list, participate in a mini-conference at the end of the course, and write an academic paperReligious Experience ( 12 EC | semester 2: February – May 2018)
  • It is the intention of the course to introduce to the varieties of research and debates concerning the topic of religious experience. We shall discuss the concept of (religious) experience, its analytical value within Religious Studies and different research approaches connected to religious experiences in different traditions or to different configurations of “experience” and “religion”. Paradigms of empirical research and case-studies will be discussed. In the last part of the course the students will work on a topic of their choice. At the end of the course the students will have the opportunity to give an oral presentation of their work under “conference-conditions”.

Utrecht University

Research Master Religious Studies
a) General information
b) Programme

  • Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion (15 EC | semester 1: September 2017 – January 2018)
    The aim of this course is twofold. Firstly, through close reading and discussion of seminal contributions to the academic study of religions, students arrive at a better understanding of the specific problems and debates of this discipline. Secondly, it is a platform for students to practice and train their skills of presentation, performance, and discussion. The reading material will have a special focus on contemporary critical theory and new approaches to the study of religion. These approaches will be discussed in relation to the students’ ongoing research.

  • Religious Texts and Interpretative Practices (5 EC | period 2; November 2017 – January 2018)
    This course is structured in four parts. The first part reviews the nexus between philology and Orientalism in the work of 19th- and 20th-century scholars of religion such as F. M. Müller, but also studies the emergence in the 21st century of new paradigms (“future philology”, distant reading) in the textual study of religion. The second part provides an overview of the scriptural canons of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, while also examining issues of power and authority in the construction, past and present, of these canons. The third part deals with interpretive techniques in the three Abrahamic traditions, from premodern types of scriptural exegesis to modern and contemporary ones. The fourth part explores religious reading techniques and interpretive practices in terms of their performative, ritual and material dimensions.

VU University Amsterdam

Research Master Religion and Theology
a) General information
b) Programme

  • Hermeneutics (6 EC | period 1; September – October 2017)
    You have developed knowledge, understanding and competences in the field of hermeneutics, with special reference to the interpretation and use of sacred writings.
    (1) You can demonstrate (in writing and/or in oral communication) your knowledge and understanding of the various definitions of hermeneutics in current scholarship as a basis for developing an adequate hermeneutic theory and praxis (= Dublin descriptor 1: knowledge and understanding).
    (2) You are competent to apply various hermeneutic theories to a case study pertinent to your master specialization (= Dublin descriptor 2: applying knowledge and understanding).
    (3) You can integrate hermeneutic theory, where possible and relevant, into a larger (multi-disciplinary) frame of reference, especially with a view to the professional community and praxis (i.e. society, academy and church) and report about this (= Dublin descriptor 3: making judgements).
    (4) You can communicate the conclusions of your research in a position paper written for a specialist (peer) audience (= Dublin descriptor 4: communication).
    (5) You can show that you are aware of the complexities of “understanding” (or not-understanding) [hermeneutic gap, text, author, reader, interpretive community, context, effective history (Wirkungsgeschichte), your own readerly perspective or stance etc.] and can deal with them professionally in a largely self-directed (autonomous) learning process (hermeneutical habitus) (= Dublin descriptor 5: learning skills).
  • Classics I: Brueggemann’s Biblical Theology (6 EC | period 4; February – March 2018) 
  • Classics II: Dostoyevsky (6 EC| Period 5; April – May 2018)
    In this course, research master students and divinity students read an absolute top classic from the field of theology and/or religious studies. Staff members are cordially invited to join in order to create a community of readers. The course will include two types of sessions. During plenary sessions (the second session of the week), the whole group will practice close reading of a rather small but representative piece of text. This meeting is particularly open to staff members. During this meeting, flow of argumentation, ambiguities and evaluation will take center stage, introduced by a few short presentations from students or staff members. During the first session of the week, a larger part of the work is discussed, with a primary emphasis on the historical context and specific methodological approaches to the text. In most of these sessions, small groups will carry out their own research on a specific part or theme the books under discussion during that week. Each subgroup will present the results of their work during the first session. At the end of the course, students will present the results of the course during a public event to which all faculty staff and students will be invited